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When Women Vote: A Zócalo/NHMLAC Event Series

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One hundred years after the passing of the 19th Amendment, Zócalo and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County present When Women Vote, a three-event series that begins with “How Have Women’s Protests Changed History?” on August 20th followed by "Why Don’t Women’s Votes Put More Women in Power?" on September 16th and "What Are Today’s L.A. Women Fighting For?" on December 3rd.

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TOPICS AND DATES

How Have Women’s Protests Changed History? 

AUGUST 20, 2020  |  THURSDAY  |  6 PM PDT

Please note that live chat participation is available on the main video stream on the Zócalo Public Square YouTube Channel.

Moderated by Rinku Sen, Co-President of Women’s March Board of Directors

There are few forces of nature more formidable than a group of women fed up with the status quo. From the French Revolution—which was sparked in part by a 7,000-woman march from Paris to Versailles—to Black Lives Matter—which was founded by three women—some of the most important protest movements in global history have been women-led. In addition to organizing many of summer 2020’s continuing marches, over the past century women have taken to the streets to rally for voting and equal rights, to condemn sexual and gun violence, and to stand against the sitting president. But protest has taken other forms too, including the #MeToo movement, anti-colonial mobilizations from Ethiopia to Southeast Asia, women taking the wheel in Saudi Arabia to demand the right to drive, and boycotts and strikes like the Women’s Political Council Montgomery bus boycott. How have women risen up collectively to create change—and influenced broader movements in the process? What has made women particularly effective protesters, and what ideas have women come up with that have changed the art of protest? 

USC labor historian Francille Rusan Wilson, Northeastern University feminist sociologist Valentine Moghadam, and UCLA gender studies professor Ju Hui Judy Han visit Zócalo to discuss the power of women saying “no” throughout history. 

Francille Rusan Wilson

Francille Rusan Wilson is an intellectual and labor historian whose research examines the intersections between Black labor movements, Black social scientists, and Black women’s history during the Jim Crow era. She is Associate Professor of American Studies & Ethnicity, History and Gender & Sexuality Studies at the University of Southern California, and the co-curator for “Rise Up LA: A Century of Votes for Women” opening online in August 2020 and in person in October 2020 at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.

Ju Hui Judy Han

Ju Hui Judy Han is a cultural geographer and assistant professor in Gender Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her comics and writings about (im)mobilities, religious politics, and feminist and queer activism have been published in journals and books including Critical Asian Studies, positions: asia critique, and Ethnographies of U.S. Empire (2018). She is currently working on a book on queer temporalities and the political order in Korea, and co-writing a book on political protest with Jennifer Chun.

Valentine M. Moghadam

Valentine M. Moghadam is Professor of Sociology and International Affairs at Northeastern University. Her areas of research include globalization, transnational social movements and feminist networks, economic citizenship, and gender and development in the Middle East and North Africa. Among her many publications is Globalizing Women: Transnational Feminist Networks (2005). Her forthcoming book, co-authored book with Shamiran Mako, is After the Arab Spring: Progress and Stagnation in the Middle East and North Africa (Cambridge 2021).

Rinku Sen

Rinku Sen is a journalist and political strategist who has been a leading voice in the racial justice for over 30 years; she is currently Co-President of the Women’s March board of directors. Sen is formerly the Executive Director of Race Forward and was Publisher of their award-winning news site Colorlines. Her books Stir it Up and The Accidental American theorize a model of community organizing that integrates a political analysis of race, gender, class, sexuality, and other systems.

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Francille Rusan Wilson is an intellectual and labor historian whose research examines the intersections between Black labor movements, Black social scientists, and Black women’s history during the Jim Crow era. She is Associate Professor of American Studies & Ethnicity, History and Gender & Sexuality Studies at the University of Southern California, and the co-curator for “Rise Up LA: A Century of Votes for Women” opening online in August 2020 and in person in October 2020 at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.

Ju Hui Judy Han is a cultural geographer and assistant professor in Gender Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her comics and writings about (im)mobilities, religious politics, and feminist and queer activism have been published in journals and books including Critical Asian Studies, positions: asia critique, and Ethnographies of U.S. Empire (2018). She is currently working on a book on queer temporalities and the political order in Korea, and co-writing a book on political protest with Jennifer Chun.

Valentine M. Moghadam is Professor of Sociology and International Affairs at Northeastern University. Her areas of research include globalization, transnational social movements and feminist networks, economic citizenship, and gender and development in the Middle East and North Africa. Among her many publications is Globalizing Women: Transnational Feminist Networks (2005). Her forthcoming book, co-authored book with Shamiran Mako, is After the Arab Spring: Progress and Stagnation in the Middle East and North Africa (Cambridge 2021).

Rinku Sen is a journalist and political strategist who has been a leading voice in the racial justice for over 30 years; she is currently Co-President of the Women’s March board of directors. Sen is formerly the Executive Director of Race Forward and was Publisher of their award-winning news site Colorlines. Her books Stir it Up and The Accidental American theorize a model of community organizing that integrates a political analysis of race, gender, class, sexuality, and other systems.

Why Don’t Women’s Votes Put More Women in Power? 

SEPTEMBER 16, 2020  |  WEDNESDAY  |  6:00 PM PDT

Please note that live chat participation is available on the main video stream on the Zócalo Public Square YouTube Channel.

Moderated by Marisa Lagos, California Politics & Government Correspondent, KQED

Since 1964, more women than men have voted in every United States presidential election. Yet we still don’t have a woman president or vice president; California, one of the first states to give women the right to vote, is one of 20 states that still hasn’t had a female governor, and Los Angeles has never had a female mayor. Why do women remain much less likely than men to run for office, despite the fact that they win elections at comparable rates (and that in some cases, women have an edge)? What would it take for women to achieve political power equal to that of men both locally and nationally? 

One hundred years after the U.S. ratified the 19th Amendment, which was meant to guarantee American women the Constitutional right to vote, Johns Hopkins University historian Martha S. Jones, author of Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All, Institute for Women’s Policy Research president C. Nicole Mason, California State Senator and author of the California Fair Pay Act Hannah Beth Jackson, and Rosie Rios, the 43rd Treasurer of the United States, visit Zócalo to discuss the impact a century of women voting has made on representation in America, California, and Los Angeles.

Dr. C. Nicole Mason

Dr. C. Nicole Mason is the president and CEO of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), a leading voice on pay equity, economic policies, and research impacting women. She studies economic security, poverty, women’s issues, and entitlement reforms; policy formation and political participation among women, communities of color, and youth; and racial equity. Prior to IWPR, Dr. Mason was the executive director of the Women of Color Policy Network at New York University’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. She is the author of Born Bright: A Young Girl’s Journey from Nothing to Something in America. Her writing has been featured in The New York Times, The Nation, The Washington Post, Marie Claire, ESSENCE, and Bustle, among others.

Martha S. Jones

Martha S. Jones is the Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor and Professor of History at The Johns Hopkins University. She is a legal and cultural historian whose work examines how black Americans have shaped the story of American democracy. Professor Jones is the author of Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America. Her latest book, published Sept. 2020, is Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Fought for Rights for All. Professor Jones is recognized as a public historian, frequently writing for broader audiences at outlets including the Washington Post, the Atlantic, USA Today, Public Books, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and Time. Professor Jones currently serves as a President of the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians, and on the Executive Board of the Organization of American Historians.

Marisa Lagos

Marisa Lagos is a correspondent for KQED’s California Politics and Government Desk and co-hosts a weekly show and podcast, Political Breakdown. At KQED, Lagos conducts reporting, analysis and investigations into state, local and national politics for radio, TV and online. Every week, she and cohost Scott Shafer sit down with political insiders on Political Breakdown, where they offer a peek into lives and personalities of those driving politics in California and beyond. Previously, she worked for nine years at the San Francisco Chronicle covering San Francisco City Hall and state politics; and at the San Francisco Examiner and Los Angeles Times. She has won awards for her work investigating the 2017 wildfires and her ongoing coverage of criminal justice issues in California. She lives in San Francisco with her two sons and husband.

Hannah-Beth Jackson

Hannah-Beth Jackson is a former prosecutor and practicing attorney, educator, and small business owner. She was elected to the California State Senate in 2012 to represent the 19th Senate District, which includes all of Santa Barbara County and western Ventura County. In the Senate, she is chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee and serves on several key committees, including the Natural Resources and Water Committee, the Labor and Industrial Relations Committee, and the Public Safety Committee. Hannah-Beth is the author of Senate Bill 358, the California Fair Pay Act, landmark legislation that established the strongest equal pay law in the country. She was recently named by the Huffington Post as one of 11 women around the country “blazing new trails” in American politics.

Rosie Rios

Rosie Rios is the CEO of Red River Associates, a real estate investment management firm. She was the 43rd Treasurer of the United States where she initiated and led the efforts to place a portrait of a woman on the front of U.S. currency for the first time in over a century. Upon her resignation in 2016, she received the Hamilton Award, the highest honor bestowed in the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Rosie was the longest serving Senate-confirmed Treasury official beginning with her time on the Treasury/Federal Reserve Transition Team in November 2008 at the height of the financial crisis. Following her tenure, she was appointed as a Visiting Scholar at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University with a focus on Millennials and Post-Millennials. Most recently she was honored in August 2020 as one of USA Today’s Women of the Century. Her personal passion includes EMPOWERMENT 2020, an initiative that facilitates the physical recognition of historical American women.

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Dr. C. Nicole Mason is the president and CEO of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), a leading voice on pay equity, economic policies, and research impacting women. She studies economic security, poverty, women’s issues, and entitlement reforms; policy formation and political participation among women, communities of color, and youth; and racial equity. Prior to IWPR, Dr. Mason was the executive director of the Women of Color Policy Network at New York University’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. She is the author of Born Bright: A Young Girl’s Journey from Nothing to Something in America. Her writing has been featured in The New York Times, The Nation, The Washington Post, Marie Claire, ESSENCE, and Bustle, among others.

Martha S. Jones is the Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor and Professor of History at The Johns Hopkins University. She is a legal and cultural historian whose work examines how black Americans have shaped the story of American democracy. Professor Jones is the author of Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America. Her latest book, published Sept. 2020, is Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Fought for Rights for All. Professor Jones is recognized as a public historian, frequently writing for broader audiences at outlets including the Washington Post, the Atlantic, USA Today, Public Books, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and Time. Professor Jones currently serves as a President of the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians, and on the Executive Board of the Organization of American Historians.

Marisa Lagos is a correspondent for KQED’s California Politics and Government Desk and co-hosts a weekly show and podcast, Political Breakdown. At KQED, Lagos conducts reporting, analysis and investigations into state, local and national politics for radio, TV and online. Every week, she and cohost Scott Shafer sit down with political insiders on Political Breakdown, where they offer a peek into lives and personalities of those driving politics in California and beyond. Previously, she worked for nine years at the San Francisco Chronicle covering San Francisco City Hall and state politics; and at the San Francisco Examiner and Los Angeles Times. She has won awards for her work investigating the 2017 wildfires and her ongoing coverage of criminal justice issues in California. She lives in San Francisco with her two sons and husband.

Hannah-Beth Jackson is a former prosecutor and practicing attorney, educator, and small business owner. She was elected to the California State Senate in 2012 to represent the 19th Senate District, which includes all of Santa Barbara County and western Ventura County. In the Senate, she is chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee and serves on several key committees, including the Natural Resources and Water Committee, the Labor and Industrial Relations Committee, and the Public Safety Committee. Hannah-Beth is the author of Senate Bill 358, the California Fair Pay Act, landmark legislation that established the strongest equal pay law in the country. She was recently named by the Huffington Post as one of 11 women around the country “blazing new trails” in American politics.

Rosie Rios is the CEO of Red River Associates, a real estate investment management firm. She was the 43rd Treasurer of the United States where she initiated and led the efforts to place a portrait of a woman on the front of U.S. currency for the first time in over a century. Upon her resignation in 2016, she received the Hamilton Award, the highest honor bestowed in the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Rosie was the longest serving Senate-confirmed Treasury official beginning with her time on the Treasury/Federal Reserve Transition Team in November 2008 at the height of the financial crisis. Following her tenure, she was appointed as a Visiting Scholar at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University with a focus on Millennials and Post-Millennials. Most recently she was honored in August 2020 as one of USA Today’s Women of the Century. Her personal passion includes EMPOWERMENT 2020, an initiative that facilitates the physical recognition of historical American women.

​What Are Today’s L.A. Women Fighting For? 

DECEMBER 3, 2020  |  THURSDAY  |  6 PM PDT

Moderated by Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times.

Women have made Los Angeles one of the nation’s most progressive cities, fighting for their own rights as well as those of children, laborers, immigrants, and other underrepresented groups since well before they gained the right to vote over 100 years ago. The city, which has the lowest gender pay gap of any American metropolis, has been a leader in creating policies designed to create wealth for working-class women in particular, from passing legislation to create the country’s first public bank to raising the minimum wage. But women in Los Angeles—particularly lower-income and Black and brown women—still face a number of challenges, including health disparities, housing struggles, and human trafficking. What battles are the women of Los Angeles fighting today, and what are the plans to win them? 

California State Senator Maria Elena Durazo, artist and Social and Public Art Resource Center co-founder Judy Baca, Social Venture Partners Los Angeles executive director Christine Margiotta, and civil rights activist and lawyer Connie Rice, co-director of the Advancement Project, visit Zócalo to discuss what all the women of Los Angeles need to truly thrive.

Dr. Judith F. Baca,

One of America’s leading visual artists, Dr. Judith F. Baca, has created public art for four decades. Powerful in size and subject matter, Baca’s murals bring art to where people live and work. In 1974, Baca founded the City of Los Angeles’ first mural program, which produced over 400 murals and employed thousands of local participants, and evolved into an arts organization known as the Social and Public Art Resource Center (SPARC). She continues to serve as SPARC’s artistic director and focuses her creative energy in the UCLA@SPARC Digital/Mural Lab, employing digital technology to promote social justice and participatory public arts projects. Currently an emeritus professor of the University of California Los Angeles, where she was a senior professor in Chicana/o Studies and World Art and Cultures Departments from 1993 until 2018.

Christine Margiotta

Christine Margiotta is passionate about channeling the collective power of Angelenos to create a more just and loving LA. In her role as Executive Director of Social Venture Partners Los Angeles, she leads a purpose-driven community of nonprofits, individuals, and foundations creating profound systemic transformation. Christine is a graduate of Scripps College and received her MSW from UCLA. She lives in Claremont with her wife, Becky, and their two children, Huck and Vivian, and she serves as the Chairperson of the L.A. County Measure H Citizen’s Oversight Advisory Board.

Connie Rice

Connie Rice is co-director of the Advancement Project. Prior to that Connie was the NAACP Legal Defense; Educational Fund, an associate at the law firm of Morrison; Foerster, and a clerk to the Honorable Damon J. Keith, judge of the United States Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit. Connie is a graduate of Harvard College and the New York University School of Law.

Angel Jennings

Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times

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One of America’s leading visual artists, Dr. Judith F. Baca, has created public art for four decades. Powerful in size and subject matter, Baca’s murals bring art to where people live and work. In 1974, Baca founded the City of Los Angeles’ first mural program, which produced over 400 murals and employed thousands of local participants, and evolved into an arts organization known as the Social and Public Art Resource Center (SPARC). She continues to serve as SPARC’s artistic director and focuses her creative energy in the UCLA@SPARC Digital/Mural Lab, employing digital technology to promote social justice and participatory public arts projects. Currently an emeritus professor of the University of California Los Angeles, where she was a senior professor in Chicana/o Studies and World Art and Cultures Departments from 1993 until 2018.

Christine Margiotta is passionate about channeling the collective power of Angelenos to create a more just and loving LA. In her role as Executive Director of Social Venture Partners Los Angeles, she leads a purpose-driven community of nonprofits, individuals, and foundations creating profound systemic transformation. Christine is a graduate of Scripps College and received her MSW from UCLA. She lives in Claremont with her wife, Becky, and their two children, Huck and Vivian, and she serves as the Chairperson of the L.A. County Measure H Citizen’s Oversight Advisory Board.

Connie Rice is co-director of the Advancement Project. Prior to that Connie was the NAACP Legal Defense; Educational Fund, an associate at the law firm of Morrison; Foerster, and a clerk to the Honorable Damon J. Keith, judge of the United States Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit. Connie is a graduate of Harvard College and the New York University School of Law.

Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times

 


 

Rise Up L.A. Oral Stories Project B&W

 

 

 

If you’d like to hear more voices from the women’s movement, visit our Rise Up L.A. Oral Stories page. 

You can listen to audio archives of oral stories of women in Los Angeles over the age of 65. Over 30 women took part in interviews conducted by our Performing Arts team, during which the subject of feminism, womanhood, and the importance of exercising your right to vote were discussed, among many other interesting personal stories. 

You can also watch a recording of our online event, Rise Up LA: Voices From the Women’s Movement, which premiered on the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment. You will meet Dorsay Dujon, Janice Lipeles, and Barbara Sanchez, as they share transcripts from their oral story interviews. As well as Sarah Crawford, Senior Manager of Exhibition Design and Development at NHMLAC, and the story they are telling with the Rise Up L.A. exhibition.